How To Boost Your Immune System With 5 Common Vitamins

Vitamin deficiencies can weaken your immune system. Raising levels through diet or supplements can help boost your immunity.

Do you feel under the weather? Worried about catching a bug the next time one starts making its way through your family and friends?

After the pandemic, many people are realizing that their immune systems may need a boost. Our immune system is our first line of defense against the viruses and bacteria we encounter every day, so it’s worth making sure yours is fighting fit and one of the key ways to maintain immune health is to supplement with vitamins and nutrients that boost the immune system.

About 30% of the US population is at risk of at least one vitamin deficiency,[1] which means our bodies lack the essential nutrients needed to keep our immune systems strong. However, we can lend a hand to our immune system by adopting a supplement routine designed to strengthen it – and the good news is that there are five easy-to-find vitamins that are perfect for the job.

Fruit and vegetable sources of vitamin C

Vitamin C not only serves to prevent scurvy; it is also important for a healthy immune system.

C vitamin

Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin with a wide variety of benefits, but one of its primary functions is to support a healthy immune system. Our bodies cannot make vitamin C on its own, so you need to get it through your diet or supplements.

As an antioxidant, vitamin C fights disease and disease and helps grow and repair tissues. It is also important for healing wounds and maintaining healthy bones, teeth and skin. It is involved in many of the body’s most essential functions, so it’s no surprise that it also plays an important role in immune health.

Vitamin C supports the immune system by protecting against pathogens and bacteria[2] and helps white blood cells function more efficiently, helping the skin form a stronger barrier against the big bads of the outside world.[3] It has even been shown to potentially reduce the severity of the common cold![4]

Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 is important for immune health. You can get it from supplements or foods, such as beef liver, poultry, salmon, chickpeas, bananas, and dark green leafy vegetables.

Vitamin B6

Being one of the eight B vitamins, vitamin B6 is essential for cellular metabolism and the continued function of red blood cells. But it also helps your body maintain a healthy immune system.

Vitamin B6 levels have been shown to be low in older adults with poor immune responses,[5] And it’s no surprise: Vitamin B6 helps more than 100 enzymes in the body perform essential functions.

Research suggests that supplementing with vitamin B6 can strengthen the immune system,[6] But that’s not all: this little vitamin has many other health benefits. In addition to strengthening the immune system, vitamin B6 can fight depression,[7] help with PMS,[8] and fight cognitive decline.[9]

Food sources of vitamin E

Vitamin E is reportedly very effective in strengthening the immune system.

Vitamin E

The vitamin E star has grown in recent years as research uncovers more about the benefits of this fat-soluble nutrient. Vitamin E is a powerful antioxidant essential for keeping the immune system strong and healthy. In fact, vitamin E has been called one of the most effective nutrients when it comes to strengthening the immune system.[10]

In addition to strengthening the immune system, vitamin E keeps skin and eyes healthy and also has powerful antioxidant qualities. As an antioxidant, vitamin E fights free radicals, unstable atoms that can damage cells, causing disease and premature aging. With free radicals contributing to many chronic health problems, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, it’s worth adding vitamin E to your diet to combat them.

But the main function of vitamin E is to support the growth of T lymphocytes, one of the two main types of cells in the body that fight infection. Vitamin E has been shown to increase the amount of T cells in the body,[11] creating an overall stronger immune system and reducing the risk of infection.

Foods rich in zinc

Zinc is not technically a vitamin. It is a trace mineral. But it is an important nutrient for strengthening the immune system.

Zinc

Zinc is one of the most useful trace minerals to have in your bathroom cabinet, serving many different purposes. Zinc improves eyesight, helps the body process nutrients, and helps wounds heal faster [12]but one of its main benefits is strengthening and boosting the immune system.

Our bodies do not produce zinc naturally, which means it must be obtained through diet or supplements, but once it is obtained, zinc is the best friend your immune system will ever have.

Zinc is important for the development and function of immune cells,[12,13] as well as boosting the activity of T lymphocytes to protect the body from infections.[14] Zinc also helps fight infections – in fact, a review of seven different studies found that zinc can reduce the duration of the common cold by up to 33%![15]

Sources of Vitamin D.

Vitamin D is really important for immune health. If you are not getting enough sun, it is important to maintain vitamin D levels through supplements or diet.

Vitamin D

Our bodies produce vitamin D naturally when we enjoy the sun, but for night owls and people who live in less sunny countries, vitamin D supplements are an easier way to get enough of this helpful vitamin into the bloodstream. Either way, vitamin D is important for growth and development, resistance to disease, and most importantly, to help the immune system function as it should.[16]

Low vitamin D levels have been linked to an increased risk of infections and diseases, particularly diseases such as arthritis, type 1 diabetes, and inflammatory bowel disease.[17] Studies have also shown that vitamin D can reduce the risk of influenza and Covid-19 infection.[18]

In addition to strengthening the immune system, vitamin D potentially helps reduce the risk of depression and anxiety.[19] If you’ve ever felt like your mood gets worse during the winter, a lack of vitamin D from sun exposure might be the reason, but it’s easily fixed with supplements.

Each vitamin on this list has a number of benefits beyond immune health, promising healthier skin and hair, faster wound healing, better cognitive health, and more, but it’s their immune-boosting qualities that make them worthy of. Attention.

Our immune system protects us every day, performing mostly invisible jobs to keep us safe from infections, diseases and viruses. Every immune system is different, but with a large body of research showing that vitamins provide essential nutrients to keep our immune systems functioning properly, adding immune supplements to our diet is one of the best defenses we have against disease. .

  1. Bird, Julia K .: “Risk of Deficiency in Multiple Concurrent Micronutrients in Children and Adults in the United States”, June 24, 2017, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5537775/
  2. Carr, Anita C. et al: “Vitamin C and Immune Function”, November 2017, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5707683/
  3. Raman, Ryan: “7 Awesome Ways Vitamin C Benefits Your Body,” Feb.18, 2020, halthline.com/nutrition/vitamin-c-benefits
  4. Chalker, Elizabeth et al: “Vitamin C for prevention and treatment of the common cold”, January 31, 2013, cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD000980.pub4/full
  5. Brennan, Dan: “Health Benefits of Vitamin B6,” November 16, 2020, webmd.com/diet/health-benefits-vitamin-b6
  6. Qian, Bingjun et al: “Effects of Vitamin B6 Deficiency on the Composition and Functional Potential of T Cell Populations”, March 6, 2017, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5358464/
  7. Hvas, Anne-Mette et al: “Vitamin B6 Level Is Associated with Symptoms of Depression”, November 2004, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15479988/
  8. Wyatt, Katrina M. et al: “Efficacy of Vitamin B-6 in the Treatment of PMS: Systematic Review,” May 22, 1999, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC27878/
  9. Malouf, R. et al: “The effect of vitamin B6 on cognition”, 2003, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/14584010
  10. Lewis, Erin Diane et al: “Regulatory Role of Vitamin E in the Immune System and Inflammation,” April 1, 2020, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7011499/
  11. Lee, Ga Young et al: “The Role of Vitamin E in Immunity”, November 1, 2018, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6266234/
  12. Kubala, Jillian: “Zinc: Everything You Need to Know”, November 14, 2020, healthline.com/nutrition/zinc
  13. Prasad, Ananda S .: “Zinc in Human Health: Effect of Zinc on Immune Cells”, May 2008, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2277319/
  14. Haase, Hajo et al: “The Immune System and the Impact of Zinc During Aging”, 2009, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2702361/
  15. Hemilä, Harri: “Zinc Lozenges and the Common Cold: A Meta-Analysis Comparing Zinc Acetate and Zinc Gluconate and the Role of Zinc Assay”, May 2, 2017, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28515951/
  16. Meeks, Sade: “Vitamin D Benefits,” Jan.14, 2022, healthline.com/health/food-nutrition/benefits-vitamina-d
  17. Martens, Pieter-Jan: “Effect of Vitamin D on Immune Function”, April 28, 2020, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7281985/
  18. Grant, William B. et al: “Evidence that Vitamin D Supplementation Could Reduce the Risk of Influenza E COVID-19
First identified in 2019 in Wuhan, China, Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). It has spread globally, resulting in the 2019–20 coronavirus pandemic.

” data-gt-translate-attributes=”[{” attribute=””>COVID-19 Infections and deaths “, April 2, 2020, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32252338/

  • Cheng, Ying-Chih et al: “The Effect of Vitamin D Supplement on Negative Emotions: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis,” June 2020, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32365423/