Clarified: Juneteenth story

Clarified: Juneteenth story

Two years after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, all enslaved people were still not free. This changed on June 19, 1865.



juneteenth is an opportunity, I think, to celebrate, commemorate and reflect on black independence in the United States and free them on June 19th. That’s why, you know, you celebrate that deep 70th birthday celebration. Yes, I’m Angela Thorpe, I’m a fucking public historian based in North Carolina. The Emancipation Proclamation was signed on January 1, 1863. It is signed in the midst of the civil war. But what we need to understand is that er, this document or this proclamation does not liberate all enslaved people. Texas is a fucking hot spot if you want to challenge the Emancipation Proclamation in particular, I think that’s part of what makes the nineteenth-century story so special that the information doesn’t get to Texas like other places. Um, and if you’re thinking of the Union Army physically advancing through the south, that journey takes a long time. Mhm Marshall didn’t say it, you know it was free or you didn’t say they went there, I think I didn’t say it with them. six months of their six months, June 19, June 18 and 65, become reality. General Granger is one of the most important people who is responsible for the occupation of Texas. Once ahem, it’s up to the union and the imposition of new realities in Texas and Galveston in particular. And one of the first things he does is announced. General order number three, informing enslaved people that they are free On the 19, you know, it’s called that they have to give him *** a big problem 19 Well now we didn’t know relax, I don’t hide the on the other side of the functional friend. We didn’t know, I just thought, you know, we’re just feeding, you know, we had a long fuck table and we just had a fuck all you wanna eat, you know, and drink it, They said it was only 19 to say that we will not eat and drink. Well, you see, I didn’t know what it was for. I think what’s really interesting about the language of his order of him is that he openly encourages or instructs previously enslaved peoples to stay where they are. And so when we think of this concept of liberation, I think it is so fascinating, incredible and powerful that the formerly enslaved men who are now black troops of the United States are an active part in spreading this information from the court to the church, to the farm, to the plantation to inform previously enslaved people. Hey, you’re free, join me, right? You are set free. But if you’ve been held in bondage for generations after generations, what does it actually look like? Will you survive even leaving that place? Will you be killed along the way? Will you be killed while trying to leave? Those are realities. Mom and they didn’t know where to go. See after the camp broke down, just like I found something, you know, I don’t know where to go in a lot of places it’s something like tent cities, right? Like people are packing their bags, creating shelters, the best way they know how I think what’s phenomenal about that story is these camps, this kind of rough settlement. Eventually in many places they evolved into small towns and small towns where blacks were able to build communities and thrive. And then there are other black people who go right there, leaving to find a family, to find love to reconnect with the family. As people moved out of Texas and moved to the country, they emigrated to the country. They carried those 1900 traditions with them. The first celebration on June 19th took place on June 19, 1866. Then they included public readings of the Emancipation Proclamation. They included harvesting and food. Uh, they included parades, picnics and they evolved from their red color is symbolic *** that symbolizes so much. Symbolizes spirituality, strength, resilience, protection. And so this is one of the reasons you see these red foods show up at the June 19th celebration. Blacks have always had free will. Blacks have always made decisions for themselves, even under the most dire circumstances. Yet it is something we are not educated about

Clarified: Juneteenth story

Two years after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation, all enslaved people were still not free. This changed on June 19, 1865.

The Emancipation Proclamation was signed by President Abraham Lincoln in the midst of the civil war on January 1, 1863. However, this proclamation does not release all enslaved people. When the Union army, some of them previously enslaved, begins to advance through the southern states to enforce the Emancipation Proclamation, it encounters great resistance. Specifically, in Texas. In this episode of Clarified, Angela Thorpe, director of the NC African American Heritage Commission, explains how General Order No. 3 signed on June 19, 1865 finally informs the enslaved people in Texas that they are free. Thorpe explains why applying the Emancipation Proclamation took so long, the nuances of order, how blacks got involved in the liberation of others, the challenges they faced after becoming free and the traditional celebrations . “Blacks have always had free will, blacks have always made decisions for themselves, even under the most dire circumstances. Yet, this is something we are not educated about,” Thorpe said. You will also hear the personal account of Laura Smalley, a former slave who was interviewed in 1941 about her memory of the first Juneteenth at the age of 86. Smalley was 10 and living in Bellville, Texas when she learned she was free. Smalley’s account brings this historic event to life and reminds us that 1865 was not long ago.

The Emancipation Proclamation was signed by President Abraham Lincoln in the midst of the civil war on January 1, 1863. However, this proclamation does not release all enslaved people.

When the Union army, some of them previously enslaved, begins to advance through the southern states to enforce the Emancipation Proclamation, it encounters great resistance. Specifically, in Texas.

In this episode of Clarified, Angela Thorpe, director of the NC African American Heritage Commission, explains how General Order No. 3 signed on June 19, 1865 finally informs the enslaved people in Texas that they are free.

Thorpe explains why applying the Emancipation Proclamation took so long, the nuances of order, how blacks got involved in the liberation of others, the challenges they faced after becoming free and the traditional celebrations .

“Blacks have always had free will, blacks have always made decisions for themselves, even under the most dire circumstances. Yet, this is something we are not educated about,” Thorpe said.

You will also hear the personal account of Laura Smalley, a former slave who was interviewed in 1941 about her memory of the first Juneteenth at the age of 86.
Smalley was 10 and living in Bellville, Texas when she learned she was free. Smalley’s account brings this historic event to life and reminds us that 1865 was not long ago.